ABOUT

CV

Krauss Adi 

Living and working in Tel Aviv, Israel

Education:

2017-2019

MFA Postgraduate Fine Art Program, 

Hamidrasha, Faculty of the arts,

Beit Berl College

BFA Graduate of Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design, Jerusalem, 2001-05

Specialization in Photography and Digital Imaging

MSO Graduate of Bio-Tech Institute of Tel Aviv, 1999-2000

Specialization in Multimedia

Winner of America-Israel Cultural Foundation Prize for Achievement in Photography, 2007

Exhibitions and Shows

Solo:

“129 Die in Jet!” – Sam Sebbe Gallery, Jerusalem, March 2006

“129 Die in Jet!” – Photography Department Gallery, Bezalel, Jerusalem, April 2006

Joint:

“Pause” – Jerusalem Cinematheque, April 2006

“Holon Now” – Digital Art Centre, Holon, May 2006

“Terminal 1” – National BG Airport, July 2006

“Artik 9” – Art Gallery, University of Tel Aviv, July 2007

“Silent Scream” – Z.O.A House, Tel Aviv, October 2007

“Visible 2013” – TBC Gallery, London, December 2013

“Unrelated – Artists support art” project, Tel Aviv, November 2016

“Ithaca” – Oranim Art College, Tivon, January 2017

“4th of July” – Yarkon Gallery, Tel Aviv, July 2019

“What matter wants” – Forum Givon, Tel Aviv, August 2019

Born as a photographer, Adi Krauss has orchestrated a space that
employs different aesthetic languages in order to make us reflect upon
the state of reality we live in, which is, in his eyes, a mix of consumerism
and cultural appropriation. The core of his installation, entitled Biblical,
is a series of trailers of a documentary, set in a call center that sells
biblical Hebrew courses. Next to it, the artist took footage from one of
the trailers, featuring flashing red light, and turn it into a work called
The Sun. Alongside these two works, Krauss has created a concrete
sculpture that transforms the most transient concept ever – that of
end of the season sales – into the most durable object ever: concrete
blocks. Closing this constellation of objects and ideas connected to
each other is a series of photocollages the artist created through the
“random cohabitation” of disparate images occurred on his screen.